Protesters denounce the blocking of EU legislation that defines rape as sex without consent

Adriana Lima
By Adriana Lima 3 Min Read
origin 1Protester in Brussels ©RockedBuzz by way of Euronews

The ladies wore purple gloves and held up banners with QR codes, which hid “intimate” messages from the ladies carrying them. The undertaking was led by the well-known Spanish artist Alicia Framis.

“I needed to show respect for the female, which is silence, retrospection, magnificence […] I believe the primary drawback for girls throughout Europe is violence, however not solely bodily violence but additionally verbal violence,” defined the artist.

Framis organized the “secret strike” in collaboration with the Spanish embassy in Brussels.

This ‘efficiency’ introduced collectively a gaggle of volunteers who stood nonetheless for ten minutes to denounce the bodily and sexual violence that impacts one in three ladies in the world, in line with the United Nations.

And this occurred as European equality ministers held a casual assembly this Friday in Pamplona, ​​Spain. The casual talks between EU member states had been geared toward passing the first European directive in opposition to violence in opposition to ladies.

Framis stated he determined to arrange this “secret strike” in entrance of the European Council constructing to denounce the blocking of legislation that would outline rape as sex without consent in the bloc’s 27 international locations.

The artist warned that “as a substitute of making progress, many international locations are considering of chopping” ladies’s rights.

The European Commission, the EU’s government arm, final yr proposed legislation to make consent-based rape legal guidelines constant throughout the bloc and to introduce a typical set of sanctions.

Feminist groups in Italy are preparing for the national day of protest against gender violence

While different particulars of the directive, which embrace a proposal to criminalize feminine genital mutilation and cyberbullying, seem to garner consensus amongst the 27 member international locations, the definition of rape based mostly on lack of consent is deeply divisive.

According to Human Rights Watch, solely 13 EU member states use consent-based definitions to criminalize rape.

Still many others require the use of drive, or menace, to hold out the punishment. France, for instance, believes that rape will be thought-about to have occurred when “an act of sexual penetration or an oral-genital act is dedicated on an individual, with violence, coercion, menace or shock”.

Negotiations between the European Parliament, member states and the European Commission have stalled because of the reluctance of some EU international locations to incorporate the crime of rape in the remaining textual content, such as France and Germany.

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